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Citation Managers

Learn about how to use Citation Managers to help with your research!

Citation Management?

Citation managers are tools that help you cite and organize the sources you find through your research. Though they may vary in their features, at their core they can help you cite your sources correctly based on the latest editions of the appropriate citation styles. Some may limit you to individual citations or individual citation styles while others will allow you to create entire bibliographies, or even store PDF's of your sources in their libraries. Citation managers are great time savers in that a well-organized list of sources can be turned into a bibliography almost instantly, saving you precious time at the end of your paper. Which citation manager you choose depends on your needs.

While many citation managers like EndNote and RefWorks are expensive for individual licenses, there are other options out there which do many of the same functions for free. 

Great! So I don't have to know how to cite, right?

Not so fast! Machine-produced bibliographies and citations are seldom perfect. You need to know how citation works and what your style should look like, even if you're using a citation manager -- if only so you can check that its work is correct!

Free Citation Managers:

Refer to the Library's usage guides for each of these citation managers using the links below: 

BIBME

 

 

bibme logo

EASYBIB

 

 

MENDELEY

mendeley logo

ZOTERO

zotero logo

How Do I Recognize and Avoid Plagiarism?

Plagiarism is the act of passing off concepts or content that have been produced previously as new, original work. In practical terms, in academic writing, this usually means quoting or paraphrasing the work of other scholars without proper citation. See the Rosemont Student Handbook for a full definition of what is considered plagiarism by the College and a description of its consequences.

Can I plagiarize without meaning to?

YES.
Every student has a responsibility to be attentive to citation concerns. Ignorance is no excuse, and unintentional plagiarism is still a serious academic offense.

Can I plagiarize from myself?

YES.
If you reuse work that has been submitted for a previous class to satisfy a current class requirement (or republish work that has already appeared without indicating that fact), it still constitutes plagiarism and will be treated accordingly.

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